Journalists share their predictions for journalism in a Nieman lab series

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Sarah Marshall: social media editor for Europe, the Middle East, and Africa for The Wall Street Journal.

“News sites will find new ways to use social media to surface stories from the archives and extend the lifecycle of content. Visual content will continue to do well on social. News organizations will invest increasing amounts of time and creativity in posting videos, images, and interactives directly to social platforms.”

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Jim Schachter: vice president of news at WNYC in New York, former editor at The New York Times

“News reports and stories increasingly will be produced and packaged in forms divorced from the formats dictated by a radio clock. Audiences want to hear news stories and talk-show segments as standalone reports: in our app or some other audio app, directly in their Twitter feed, in playlists of their own creation or playlists generated by an algorithm that takes into account their listening habits.”

Dan Gillmor teaches digital media literacy at Arizona State University’s Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication.

Dan Gillmor: teaches digital media literacy at Arizona State University’s Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication.

“Journalists should be inspired by the Snowden effect. They should focus more on critical mass — how to achieve it and how to sustain it. If journalism is to matter, we can’t just raise big topics. We have to spread them, and then sustain them. Moreover, the journalists and organizations have paced themselves in revealing new information every week or two, in a drumbeat that reveals one stunning piece of news after another.”

Etan Horowitz: mobile editor at CNN.

Etan Horowitz: mobile editor at CNN.

“On-demand, personalized, and available seamlessly on any screen. We’ll see this in more personalized mobile alerts. The mobile app alert is perhaps the most intimate of all forms of news delivery, as information is sent directly to your pocket regardless of where you are or what you are doing. Since it is so personal, consumers only want to receive alerts that are relevant to them. We will also likely see news content starting to pop up in wearables like smartwatches and perhaps even smart appliances. When consumers want to watch the latest show from CNN and or read a favorite columnist, they’ll just have to reach for whatever Internet connected device is nearest to them.”

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